Saturday, August 21, 2010

Rock Solid Recrap: Stuck In Traffic

I assume everyone reading has a pretty firm handle on what happened.

The spotlight shines brightly on Huston Street, as it has far too many times in the last month. He's struggling, badly, not going to deny that one, folks, but it would be silly to sit here and write an entire column on that, when the problems run much deeper than that.

You may think the Rockies made strides offensively last night, but the fact is they still managed to make a pitcher look a lot better than he really is.

Ian Kennedy is not a #1 or #2 in any rotiation around the league. Maybe not even a #3 or #4. He only remains in that role because Brandon Webb is hurt, Dan Haren and Edwin Jackson were traded to shed salary, and Max Scherzer was traded because Josh Byrnes is an idiot.

Basically they have no choice but to label him ace...err workhorse... err whatever they really label him.

Kennedy did not bring an A game last night, even by his standards. A good offense puts an easy 7 or 8 on the board against him and puts him in the shower by the third inning. The opportunites were endless. The all important "traffic" was jammed inning after inning, yet the Rockies only scratched out three runs.

And then when the worst bullpen in baseball came in?  Nothing improved.  It actually regressed.

I know there are some people out there trying to reinvent baseball with overthought stats. Most of those people would like to completely ignore the RBI stat flat out. Fine, whatever, an RBI doesn't truly define a player's skill level. blah blah.


But it defines wins and losses.

Team wins and losses are the only stats that really matter. If not, then what the hell is anyone playing for?

People who find ways to drive in runs -- whether they be with home runs, singles, sac flys, walks, whatever -- make the money because scoring runs is what wins baseball games.

Does traffic increases your chance to score runs?

Again.. Duh.

But 100% of base runners (I don't count a HR as a base runner) have to be driven in. It's a part of the game. It will continue to a be part of the game. Attempt to devalue it all you want, but anyone who watches this baseball team day in and day out should know better than anyone that driving in a key run is often the difference between a win and a loss.

It freaking matters.


Ubaldo Jimenez